Starting a gratitude practice? You’ll be in good company.

In Tim Ferriss's latest book 'Tribe of Mentors', almost every one of these high achievers mentions some kind of gratitude practice and how important it is in their lives. One very powerful way to express gratitude is to write a gratitude letter.


Wellbeing comes from the simple pleasures
Grateful for the beauty of nature. pic: Alexandru Tudorache

Here’s how to write a gratitude letter and why it works.

Time required

At least 15 minutes for writing the letter and at least 30 minutes for the visit

How to do it

Call to mind someone who did something for you for which you are extremely grateful but to whom you never expressed your deep gratitude. This could be a relative, friend, teacher, or colleague. Try to pick someone who is still alive and could meet you face-to-face in the next week. It may be most helpful to select a person or act that you haven’t thought about for a while—something that isn’t always on your mind.

Now, write a letter to one of these people, guided by the following steps.

  • Write as though you are addressing this person directly (“Dear ______”)
  • Don’t worry about perfect grammar or spelling.
  • Describe in specific terms what this person did, why you are grateful to this person, and how this person’s behavior affected your life. Try to be as concrete as possible.
  • Describe what you are doing in your life now and how you often remember his or her efforts.
  • Try to keep your letter to roughly one page (~300 words).

Next, you should try if at all possible to deliver your letter in person, following these steps:

  • Plan a visit with the recipient. Let that person know you’d like to see him or her and have something special to share, but don’t reveal the exact purpose of the meeting.
  • When you meet, let the person know that you are grateful to them and would like to read a letter expressing your gratitude; ask that he or she refrain from interrupting until you’re done.
  • Take your time reading the letter. While you read, pay attention to his or her reaction as well as your own.
  • After you have read the letter, be receptive to his or her reaction and discuss your feelings together.
  • Remember to give the letter to the person when you leave.

If physical distance keeps you from making a visit, you may choose to arrange a phone or video chat.

Why it works

The letter affirms positive things in your life and reminds you how others have cared for you—life seems less bleak and lonely if someone has taken such a supportive interest in us. Visiting the giver allows you to strengthen your connection with her and remember how others value you as an individual.

Courtesy the Greater Good Science Centre